The Difference Between Dry Lining and Wet Plastering

Are you in the middle of a renovation or a redecoration project? Between dry lining and wet plastering, which option are you choosing to finish internal walls and ceiling? You need to decide between the two for getting that professional finish.

 

Understandably, making a decision is very difficult as both options have their pros and cons. There are many factors on which the two are differentiated, which we’ll look into in today’s post. Read on to help you decide which is the better way to get that professional finish on your interior walls.

Are you in the middle of a renovation or a redecoration project? Between dry lining and wet plastering, which option are you choosing to finish internal walls and ceiling? You need to decide between the two for getting that professional finish.

 

Understandably, making a decision is very difficult as both options have their pros and cons. There are many factors on which the two are differentiated, which we’ll look into in today’s post. Read on to help you decide which is the better way to get that professional finish on your interior walls.

 

Dry Lining: What Is It?

Whether you’re constructing a new home or renovating one, one of the things you’ll have to consider is the walls. There are two common materials used, and one of which is the dry lining. This option became a hugely popular choice among homeowners as it’s a much easier and quicker technique compared to the traditional method.

 

In this method, the plasterboards are cut to fit into the walls and fastened to a frame. These boards are fastened using fibreglass mesh tape in all the corners. Three layers of the compound will then be added to produce a smooth finish. This ensures that the wall is ready for painting.

 

Pros

-Easy and quicker to install than traditional plastering

-Allows you to save more on labour costs

-Adds a layer of insulation

-Reduces heat loss

-Helps lower your energy bills

-Plasterboard materials are nontoxic and safe

-Less likely to develop cracks and sustain damage compared to plaster

-Popular and is therefore available anywhere

 

Cons

-After installation, the plasterboards lack the sturdiness and solidity of plastered walls

-Because of the lack of texture and character, it is less attractive even when the paint is applied to its surface

-Uses synthetic insulating materials that cannot be recycled

-Not economical

-Poor sound insulation

 

Wet Plastering: What Is It?

This is a popular choice among homeowners as it’s a long-lasting material. Widely used by highly skilled plasterers, this type of wall is installed by putting a plaster on a concrete wall without plasterboard. After making sure that it adheres to the wall securely, it is then levelled for a smooth finish.

 

This also ensures resistance and long-lasting durability. Many homeowners prefer having wall plaster and concrete in their homes not only for aesthetics but also for more security.

 

Pros

-Complies with safety standards

-Fire-resistant

-Keeps noise out from your home

-More soundproof than dry lining walls

-Incredibly durable and long-lasting so you won’t be spending too much on maintenance

-Excellent texture

-Great aesthetics, giving your home a more sophisticated look

 

Cons

-Since it is made of thick material, it may be harder to repair or replace when the wall sustains damage

-More expensive than dry lining walls

 

Breaking Down the Options: Which Is Better?

Dry lining is a faster solution because getting a piece of plasterboard in place doesn’t take long compared to installing traditional plaster walls. If you’re looking to speed things up while avoiding the problem of cracks and surface issues caused by wet plaster, then dry lining is the option for you.

 

But then, wet plaster also offers a lot of benefits. When you choose between cement or gypsum that’s trowelled onto blockwork, you will find that the cost is about the same as both need to be finished with a skim of gypsum. Wet plaster is an especially good choice for tricky areas, but it takes highly skilled plasterers to install it properly.

 

Traditional materials like lime or clay cost more. But if you like a finish that’s in keeping with natural renovations, then this option may work for you.

 

Consider the speed and price

If you choose plasterboard, you can tape over joints. Alternatively, you can add a skim layer of plaster over the whole surface. As for dry lining, they can be screwed onto timber frames or joined to the wall with adhesive.

 

However, be informed that fixings such as heating and shelves aren’t always simple with dry lining. On the other hand, plastered walls make this a simpler job. So, you see, even if the basic costs aren’t that much different between wet plaster and dry lining, the labour costs are much higher for the latter. The time difference is also another thing to consider.

 

It takes a few days to dry freshly plastered walls, but dry lining doesn’t take that long. If you prefer to save on labour costs and want to speed things up, you may be better off considering this option. But if you’re concerned about the fixtures on the wall, then go for the more aesthetic wet plaster.

 

For Professional Finish on Your Walls, Use Plastering Services

If you want to get a professional finish on your interior walls, consider using wet plastering services. Here at Paul Atkins Plastering, we can handle your construction or renovation project and ensure that your home’s walls get the professional finish they deserve. For more information on domestic plastering, feel free to call us.

0
Feed

Leave a comment